The EEBO Trap

Foxetrap

I’m in the midst of digging through “Early English Books Online” (EEBO) to download research items for this pesky wee paper I have to write. I keep getting sidetracked – trapped, if you will – by woodworking things.

Case in point: a fascinating book on, among other things, angling, that shows how to make various and sundrie [sic] traps from wood: “A booke of fishing with hooke & line, and of all other instruments thereunto belonging. Another of sundrie engines and trappes to take polcats, buzards, rattes, mice and all other kindes of vermine & beasts whatsoeuer, most profitable for all warriners, and such as delight in this kinde of sport and pastime,” by Leonard Mascall.

These look downright medieval…but they’re actually early modern – or at least the book is: 1590.

 

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About fitz

Editor & content director for Popular Woodworking, ABD PhD focused on early modern drama, freelance content and copy editor/writer, ailurophile
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4 Responses to The EEBO Trap

  1. LostArtPress says:

    That one on the left looks like it caught a real nice ice cream cone.

  2. John Vernier says:

    I read this just after discovering that the mice have managed to steal the bait out of the electric trap. They seem to be using the cave crickets as shock troops. I need to up my game, so thanks for the tip!

  3. EEBO is such a great resource (and source of distraction) – I’ve spent many a happy day trawling for source material on EEBO. In fact thanks to EEBO, and now residing in a safe corner of my hard drive, there is a folder of the key primary material for my doctoral thesis, just waiting until I have the time to start my PhD (a tentative title: Historiography as metaphor: portrayals of radical evangelism in English Civil War propaganda).

    The mouse traps are a much better find however.

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